The Expulsion of the Concept of Protection from the Consumer Law and the Return of Social Elements in the Civil Law: A bittersweet polemic

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author MICKLITZ, Hans-Wolfgang
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-14T14:40:58Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-14T14:40:58Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.issn 1725-6739
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1814/20374
dc.description.abstract Consumer law started in the 1960s and 1970s as consumer protection law, meant to compensate for the risks and deficiencies of the consumption society which led to an enormous increase. The target of the first generation of national consumer law were the weak consumers, those who could not cope with the increased choice and the resulting risks. The argument here presented is that the European Union by taking over consumer legislation gradually but steadily changed the outlook, from consumer protection law into consumer law. The weak consumer is not the one who is needed for the completion of the Internal Market. This is the famous average consumer which governs todays’ normative design of the consumer law making and enforcement. However, the shift in paradigm does not set aside the need to strive for legal rules that cover the weakest in the society. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.relation.ispartofseries EUI LAW en
dc.relation.ispartofseries 2012/03 en
dc.subject Consumer law en
dc.subject private law en
dc.subject European private law en
dc.subject the average consumer en
dc.subject the weak consumer en
dc.title The Expulsion of the Concept of Protection from the Consumer Law and the Return of Social Elements in the Civil Law: A bittersweet polemic en
dc.type Working Paper en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record