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dc.contributor.authorSCOTT, Joan W.
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-06T10:33:25Z
dc.date.available2013-06-06T10:33:25Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1830-7736
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/27190
dc.descriptionThe lecture was delivered on 15 May 2013.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the connections made between religion and women by French secularizers in the nineteenth century as a way of understanding the effects of what Max Weber called "disenchantment." It asks how differences of sex figured in anti-clerical writings (particularly those of Jules Michelet). And it argues that the conflation of women and religion, an aspect of their simultaneous privatization and their designation as "irrational," helped secure the place of the difference of sex as the ontological ground for political and social organization in the nations of the West from the seventeenth century onwards.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWP LSen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2013/05en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectWomen and religionen
dc.subjectMax Weberen
dc.subject“Disenchantment”en
dc.subjectJules Micheleten
dc.subjectAnti-clerical writingen
dc.subjectPolitical and social organizationen
dc.titleWomen and religion in nineteenth-century Franceen
dc.typeOtheren
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