Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWOLFE, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-29T16:33:09Z
dc.date.available2013-11-29T16:33:09Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1028-3625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/28963
dc.description.abstractThe commonplace tendency is to blame the difficulties of the Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations on the World Trade Organization (WTO) itself. In contrast, I suggest in the first part of this paper that exogenous structural factors, especially changing commodity prices and trade flows, fatally undermined the round. In the second part I discount the significance of endogenous institutional factors such as the number of participants, the size of the agenda, or the Single Undertaking, although design failures, notably in the “modalities” for negotiation, did hurt. But what hurt even more was the way the WTO, in common with most multilateral organizations, has not caught up with the shifting centre of gravity in global governance. The trading system is no longer a transatlantic bargain. The regulatory issues on the 21st century trade policy agenda will inevitably be negotiated in Geneva, but only after a new trans-Pacific accommodation recognizes China’s central role.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI RSCASen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2013/85en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGlobal Governance Programme-72en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGlobal Economicsen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectWTOen
dc.subjectDoha rounden
dc.subjectTrade agreementsen
dc.subjectNegotiationsen
dc.subjectInternational cooperationen
dc.subject.otherTrade, investment and international cooperation
dc.titleFirst diagnose, then treat : what ails the Doha Round?en
dc.typeWorking Paperen
eui.subscribe.skiptrue


Files in this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record