Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAKSENOVA, Marina 
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-14T15:01:58Z
dc.date.available2014-07-14T15:01:58Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationFlorence : European University Institute, 2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/32092
dc.descriptionDefence date: 9 June 2014en
dc.descriptionExamining Board: Professor Martin Scheinin, EUI (Supervisor) Professor Nehal Bhuta, EUI Professor William Schabas, Middlesex University, London Judge Christine Baroness Van den Wyngaert, International Criminal Court.
dc.descriptionThis PhD thesis was awarded the Cappelletti Prize.
dc.description.abstractComplicity is a criminal law doctrine that attributes responsibility to those who do not physically perpetrate the crime. It is an essential mode of liability for core international crimes because it reaches out to senior political and military leadership. These persons do not usually engage in direct offending, yet in the context of mass atrocities they are often more culpable than foot soldiers. The Statutes of the ad hoc tribunals, hybrid courts and the International Criminal Court expressly provide for different forms of complicity, and domestic legal systems recognize it in one form or another. This is in contrast with alternative modes of liability implied from the Statutes to address the situations with multiple accused removed from the scene of the crime / (in)direct co-perpetration, extended perpetration and the joint criminal enterprise.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD theses
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Law
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/44564
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject.lcshInternational criminal law
dc.subject.lcshCriminal liability (International law)
dc.titleComplicity in international criminal law
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/519308


Files in this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record