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dc.contributor.authorGHOSH, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-10T11:28:10Z
dc.date.available2014-12-10T11:28:10Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1830-7736
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/33817
dc.descriptionThe lecture was delivered on Wednesday 15 October 2014.en
dc.description.abstractIn 1964 the question of Weber’s present-day significance was an open one which was passionately debated, but in 2014 his canonical position is so secure that it seems superfluous. Nonetheless, the question should be asked, because if it is not, then any view of Max Weber as an integral thinker recedes into the distance, and he dissolves into a series of specialized fragments. The lecture suggests that Weber is important above all because he is a universalist thinker capable of operating under modern conditions, such as specialization and cultural difference, that are radically hostile to universalism. How could he do this ? To answer this question, we should consider, first, the more obviously universalist areas of his thought (academic “science” or Wissenschaft, religion, law) and then the one that is not (politics). However, this is matter for four lectures at least. So here we shall begin at the beginning: with Wissenschaft.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWP LSen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2014/07en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectWeberen
dc.subjectWissenschaften
dc.subjectMethodologyen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subjectValue-freedomen
dc.subjectUniversitiesen
dc.subjectPoliticsen
dc.subjectIntellectual freedomen
dc.subjectStudentsen
dc.titleWhy should we read Max Weber today? : his conception of Wissenschaften
dc.typeOtheren
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