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dc.contributor.editorKUTZ, Christopher
dc.contributor.editorRISS, Christopher
dc.contributor.editorROY, Olivier
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T14:37:52Z
dc.date.available2015-05-05T14:37:52Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationFlorence : European University Institute, 2015, RELIGIOWESTen
dc.identifier.isbn9789290842873
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/35643
dc.description.abstractThe recent years have seen, in the West, an increasing debate on the presence of religious symbols in the public sphere (crucifix in Italy, minaret in Switzerland, veil and burqa in France, mosques, Ten Commandments and even Christmas trees in the USA, etc.). Most of the cases ended in court decisions, either local courts, supreme courts or the European Court of Human Rights, but with no clear results in terms of defining a coherent management of religious signs in public sphere. Why this increasing tensions and criminalization of the debate on religion? Is this the consequence of a growing secularization that aims at eradicating any remnants of religion, or, on the contrary, a “return of the sacred” that tries to reconquer the public sphere? Are we witnessing a clash of civilizations, where traditional cultures fight against newcomers (Islam in the West) by re-asserting a religious identity more than a religious faith? Is this more a conflict of religiosities, that is of personal experiencing of faith, where new believers (converts and born-again) strive to exhibit their faith more than to insert it in inconspicuous social practices? In any case, the debate has far reaching consequences: if the courts have to decide about religious signs, they have also to define what a religious sign is, and by consequence what is a religion, although most national constitutions prevent the state to interfere with theology and internal organization of faith communities.en
dc.description.tableofcontentsI. Religious Norms in the Public Sphere: The Challenge 12 II. The Debate of Islamic Norms in Arab Countries 28 III. The Case of European Countries 40 IV. The Case of North American Countries 68 V. The Case of Asian Countries 77 VI.Keynote Address 87 VII. How to face the Challenge of Religious Norms and the Public Sphere? 96 VIII.Transatlantic Network of Scholars on Muslims’ Religious Identity, Secularism, Democracy, and Citizenship 107en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/269860en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRELIGIOWESTen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.eui.eu/Projects/ReligioWest/Home.aspxen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleReligious norms in the public sphere : proceedings of a conference held at UC Berkeley on May 6-7, 2011en
dc.typeBooken
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/298
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