Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorROSSI SILVANO, Agustín 
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-21T15:09:10Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationFlorence : European University Institute, 2016en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/43369
dc.descriptionDefence date: 19 September 2016en
dc.descriptionExamining Board: Professor Sven Steinmo, European University Institute (Supervisor); Professor Alexander Trechsel, European University Institute; Professor Henry Farrell, George Washington University; Professor Bastiaan Van Apeldoorn, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdamen
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a collection of three stand-alone papers each making distinct contributions and addressing different, but closely related, empirical puzzles that contribute to the literature on Internet privacy. The first article starts by exploring some of the tangible consequences of the Snowden revelations and challenges the common-wisdom culturalist theories of Europe’s privacy regime. Then, the second article offers a new explanation of the origins of America’s privacy framework that also defies conventional culturalist explanations. Finally, the third article closes by offering a novel implementation and policy design analysis of the American and European privacy regimes. Each article employs slightly different research methods and uses different yet compatible and complementary theoretical frameworks. In general, this dissertation adopts an institutionalist perspective studying how and why certain institutions change, and “why some flourish in some context and/or why some die out in others” (Steinmo, 2003a). The first article focuses on institutional reform, and resistance to institutional reform by corporate actors, following Culpepper’s quiet politics framework (2011). The second article, borrowing from Steinmo (2003b) and Blyth (2002, 2011), discusses the interaction between ideas and institutions, following perhaps the clearest institutionalist narrative of all the pieces of this dissertation. The third article, building on Rothstein’s general theory on implementation (Rothstein, 1998) discusses the implementation and policy design of the European and American institutions for the protection of privacy.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Political and Social Sciencesen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccessen
dc.subject.lcshPrivacy, Right of -- Europe
dc.subject.lcshPrivacy, Right of -- United States
dc.subject.lcshData protection -- Europe
dc.subject.lcshData protection -- United States
dc.subject.lcshInternet -- Social aspects
dc.titleInternet privacy in the European Union and the United States : three essays on privacy, the Internet, politics, implementation, business power, and surveillance in the European Union and the United Statesen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/587160
dc.embargo.terms2020-09-19
dc.date.embargo2020-09-19


Files in this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record