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dc.contributor.authorPETERSMANN, Ernst-Ulrich
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-17T10:00:51Z
dc.date.available2017-01-17T10:00:51Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationJournal of international economic law (JIEL), 2016, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 389-392
dc.identifier.issn1464-3758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/44790
dc.description.abstractIn numerous publications, John Jackson emphasized 'the strong link between international law and national constitutional systems, which must be understood in order to understand the international economic system'. 1 This short contribution in memory of John endorses-and elaborates on-Jackson's proposition that 'international lawyers must morph into constitutional lawyers' and adopt a 'constitutional approach to international law'. 2 John's regular visits to the World Trade Organization (WTO) at Geneva and the European Union (EU) institutions at Brussels, like his participation in trade law conferences all over the world, illustrated his 'cosmopolitan commitment' (as a 'citizen of the world') to building a stronger international legal and mutually beneficial trading community. Yet, his 'constitutional mind-set' remained rooted in the unique US constitutional law system rather than in rights-based 'cosmopolitan constitutionalism' or market-based 'economic cosmopolitanism'.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of international economic law
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.titleWhy treaty interpretation and adjudication require 'constitutional mind-sets'en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jiel/jgw042
dc.identifier.volume19
dc.identifier.startpage389
dc.identifier.endpage392
eui.subscribe.skiptrue
dc.identifier.issue2


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