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dc.contributor.authorHOOGHE, Liesbet 
dc.contributor.authorMARKS, Gary 
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-24T09:54:55Z
dc.date.available2017-01-24T09:54:55Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationOxford : Oxford University Press, 2016, Transformations in governanceen
dc.identifier.isbn9780198766971
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/44967
dc.description.abstractThe book argues that jurisdictional design is shaped by functional and communal pressures. Functional pressures arise from the character of the public goods provided by government: their scale economies, externalities, and informational asymmetries. However, to explain demands for self-rule one needs to understand how people think and act in relation to the communities they conceive themselves belonging. The authors demonstrate that scale and community explain basic features of governance, including the growth of multiple tiers over the past six decades; how jurisdictions are designed; why governance within the state has become differentiated; and the extent to which regions exert authority.en
dc.description.tableofcontents-- List of Tables -- List of Figures -- List of Maps -- Prologue 1. Scale and Community 2. Measuring Regional Authority 3. Trends in Regional Authority 4. Designing Jurisdictions 5. Community and Differentiated Governance 6. Community and the Structure of Governance 7. Five Theses on Regional Governance -- References -- Indexen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleCommunity, scale, and regional governance : a postfunctionalist theory of governance, Volume IIen
dc.typeBooken
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