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dc.contributor.authorANDRE, Vivianeen
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-09T08:15:24Z
dc.date.available2006-06-09T08:15:24Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.citationFlorence : European University Institute, 2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/4905
dc.descriptionDefence date: 11 October 2002
dc.descriptionExamining Board: Prof. Michael Artis, European University Institute; Prof. Jean-Marc Boussard, INRA, Paris; Prof. Roger Farmer, UCLA (Supervisor); Prof. Hubert Kempf, Université de Paris I
dc.descriptionFirst made available online on 12 April 2018
dc.description.abstractAgriculture is currently being liberalized. In industrialized countries, it consists in reducing agricultural support, while in developing countries, agricultural taxation has to be reduced. Simultaneously, the farmer’s status has significantly changed over the last two decades, both in industrialized and developing countries, with more and more farmers also having off-farm occupations. This dissertation describes these changes, and provides a quantitative assessment o f the distributive effects of agricultural reforms. Indeed, these reforms lead to dramatic consequences in terms of welfare distribution, between farmers and non-farmers, and among fanners themselves. This analysis complements already existing studies by taking into account the changing definition of a farmer, leading to new results about the agricultural instruments most adapted to different economic, political and social objectives. The methodology used is a calibrated mono-country general equilibrium model, applied to the European Union and to a very poor representative developing country, where the share o f agriculture in the economy is very large. The main results show that, in both kinds of countries, agricultural liberalization improves the global welfare o f the society, although some groups suffer from it. Indeed, in the European Union, farmers' s welfare decreases dramatically when agricultural support measures are eliminated. Some compensation schemes should hence be implemented, and direct payments appear to be the best instrument to target specific farmers. In developing countries, agricultural liberalization is likely to hurt the most vulnerable part of the society, urban poor and rural small producers. In this context, the elimination of the production tax should be preferred to that of marketing boards.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Economicsen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject.lcshIncome distribution
dc.subject.lcshWelfare economics
dc.subject.lcshAgriculture
dc.titleAgricultural liberalization, income distribution and welfareen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/595757
dc.neeo.contributorANDRE|Viviane|aut|
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