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dc.contributor.authorMICKLITZ, Hans-Wolfgang 
dc.contributor.authorPALKA, Przemyslaw 
dc.contributor.authorPANAGIS, Yannis
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-11T07:48:52Z
dc.date.available2018-01-11T07:48:52Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationJournal of consumer policy, 2017, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 367-388en
dc.identifier.issn0168-7034
dc.identifier.issn1573-0700
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/49964
dc.descriptionPublished online: 19 June 2017en
dc.description.abstractThe authors argue that it is possible to partly automate the process of abstract control of fairness of clauses in online consumer contracts. The authors present a theoretical and empirical argument for this claim, including a brief presentation of the software they have designed. This type of automation would not replace human lawyers but would assist them and make their work more effective and efficient. Policy makers should direct their attention to the potential of using algorithmic techniques in enforcing the law regarding unfair contractual terms, and to facilitating research on and ultimately implementing such technologies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of consumer policyen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleThe empire strikes back : digital control of unfair terms of online servicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10603-017-9353-0
dc.identifier.volume40en
dc.identifier.startpage367en
dc.identifier.endpage388en
dc.identifier.issue3en


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