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dc.contributor.authorLAWTON, Thomas C.en
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-09T09:16:05Z
dc.date.available2006-06-09T09:16:05Z
dc.date.created1995en
dc.date.issued1995en
dc.identifier.citationFlorence, European University Institute, 1995
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/5313
dc.descriptionDefence date: 9 June 1995
dc.descriptionExamining board: Michael Borrus (University of California at Barkeley) ; Prof. Roger Morgan (European University Institute) ; Prof. Lynn Mytelka (Carleton University and the University of Paris X, Nanterre) ; Prof. Susan Strange (Supervisor, Warwick University) ; Prof. Douglas Webber (INSEAD, Fontainebleau)
dc.descriptionFirst made available online 14 November 2016.
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is concerned with the changing nature of European Community (EC) policies towards semiconductor producing firms. It is an important tale to recount, as industrial affairs have, since the early 1980s, been at the forefront of Europe's search for common areas of action. The creation of a single Community-wide industrial policy may thus be viewed as another substantial step towards economic and political union. Whereas other works look at the European Monetary System (EMS) for instance, and test its success or failure as a policy to enhance integration, I look at industrial policy and endeavour to place it in the context of the integration process. One of the hypotheses which I want to develop in this work is that EC policy for the semiconductor industry evolved as part of the Community's efforts to create a common area of action for industrial affairs. The shift in policy emphasis away from the national and towards the EC level for this industry, established semiconductors as the Community's vanguard high technology industry in the post-Single European Act drive towards economic integration. This hypothesis can only be tested through a critical study of EC industrial policy. In undertaking such a study, I am aware of the need to advance a definition of this much abused concept, and to identify its constituent policy mechanisms. Moreover, it is essential to look at how policy evolves and who (i.e. which actors) exerts the greatest degree of control over the policy-making process.
dc.format.mediumPaperen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Political and Social Sciencesen
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/22582
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject.lcshTechnology and state -- European Union countries
dc.subject.lcshSemiconductor industry -- European Union countries
dc.titleTechnology and the new diplomacy : the creation and control of EC industrial policy, with special reference to semiconductorsen
dc.typeThesisen
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