After finalité? The Future of the European Constitutional Idea

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dc.contributor.author WALKER, Neil
dc.date.accessioned 2007-06-06T12:54:53Z
dc.date.available 2007-06-06T12:54:53Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.issn 1725-6739
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1814/6864
dc.description.abstract This paper sets out to examine the prospects for EU constitutionalism in the light of the protracted and perhaps insuperable difficulties surrounding the ratification of the 2004 Constitutional Treaty. It argues that these difficulties simply reinforce the need for thinking about the EU's constitutional settlement in non 'finalist' terms. The EU polity has always been and remains dynamic and open-ended, and so the attempt to 'contain' it within a final settlement is probably in practice misconceived, as well as leading to deep disagreement about the terms of any such purported final agreement. The constitutional idea remains a powerful one - a key way for the European polity to think about itself seriously as collective project rather than the sum of it various national parts - provided the association of constitutional thought and method with finalité is broken. en
dc.format.extent 203234 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher European University Institute
dc.relation.ispartofseries EUI LAW en
dc.relation.ispartofseries 2007/16 en
dc.subject European Convention en
dc.subject Treaty reform en
dc.subject constitutional change en
dc.subject constitution building en
dc.subject referendum en
dc.subject identity en
dc.title After finalité? The Future of the European Constitutional Idea en
dc.type Working Paper en
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