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dc.contributor.authorPETROVA, Margarita H.
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-11T10:18:05Z
dc.date.available2007-12-11T10:18:05Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.issn1830-7728
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/7644
dc.description.abstractThe paper focuses on the influence of small states on the development of new international norms regulating the conduct of warfare. It examines the role of two small European states – Belgium and Norway – in two cases of developing new prohibitions on weapons with severe impact on the civilian population – antipersonnel landmines and cluster munitions. The paper argues that Belgium and Norway played leading, though different, roles in those two processes and emphasizes the importance of several interrelated factors for obtaining a better understanding of the role of small states in shaping new international norms: first, domestic actions on these issues were achieved as a result of the active involvement of individuals, the creation of effective partnerships between policymakers and NGOs, and media interest; second, once domestic actions lay the ground for international norm development, factors such as national identity and diplomatic traditions influenced the roles small states played on the international stage.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWPen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2007/28en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectSmall statesen
dc.subjectnorm developmenten
dc.subjectnorms of waren
dc.subjectweapons restrictionsen
dc.subjectnon-governmental organizationsen
dc.titleSmall States and New Norms of Warfareen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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