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dc.contributor.authorSARTOR, Giovanni
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-26T14:51:39Z
dc.date.available2009-05-26T14:51:39Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.issn1725-6739
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/11373
dc.description.abstractI shall argue for a sufficientist understanding of reasonableness in legal decision-making: cognitive or moral optimality are not required for reasonableness; what needed is just that a determination—be it epistemic or practical—is sufficiently good (acceptable, or at least not unacceptable). Correspondingly, judicial review on the ground of unreasonableness requires more than mere suboptimality: it requires failure to achieve the reasonableness threshold. To develop this idea, I shall first analyse the notions of rationality and reasonableness, examining the role they play in cognition. I shall then consider rationality in legal (and in particular legislative) decision-making, focusing on teleological reasoning. I shall consequently develop an idea of sufficientist reasonableness, by combining the idea of bounded rationality with the idea of deference, as required by institutional coordination in the legal process. Finally, I shall consider when a legislative determination can be considered irrational or unreasonable, and how this is related to the violation of constitutional requirements.en
dc.description.tableofcontents1. Introduction .... 1 2. Reasonableness and Rationality ...... 1 3. The Process of Rational Problem-Solving in Individuals.... 4 4. Rationality and Practical Determinations ... 9 5. The Reflective Dimension of Reasoning.... 11 6. Teleological Reasoning: Using Reason in the Pursuit of Goals or Values.... 13 7. The Evaluation of Plans...15 8. Bounded Rationality and Teleology ....18 9. The Evaluation of Outcomes ..... 19 10. Pareto Superiority.... 20 11. Weighing Alternatives....21 12. Simplifying Evaluations.... 24 13. The Rationality of Legislative Choices ... 26 14. Constitutional Commitments and Legislative Rationality ... 28 15. The Constitutional Evaluation of Legislative Choices: Reasonableness and Deference .... 34 16. A Sufficientist Understanding of Proportionality...37 17. Constitutional Teleology and Implied Constitutional Norms .... 42 18. Conclusion..... 44 References .... 45en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI LAWen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2009/07en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectProportionalityen
dc.subjectbalancingen
dc.subjectrightsen
dc.subjectconstitutionen
dc.titleA Sufficientist Approach to Reasonableness in Legal Decision-Making and Judicial Reviewen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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