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dc.contributor.authorGRIGOLO, Michele
dc.contributor.authorLIETAERT, Matthieu
dc.contributor.authorMARIMON, Ramon
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-18T15:10:35Z
dc.date.available2010-02-18T15:10:35Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationEuropean political science, 2010, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 118-130en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/13341
dc.description.abstractMany researchers trained in Europe leave to work abroad, particularly in the USA. This brain drain phenomenon is the result of a lack of openness and competition in European academic systems. Some changes relating to the mobility of academic careers could make a difference in attracting – and maintaining – researchers, apart from serious structural reform. Performance-related salary policies, as well as proper working conditions, are key incentives to attract researchers. To some extent, efficient post-doctoral programmes and gender-equity policies should be considered too.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleShifting from academic ‘brain drain’ to ‘brain gain’ in Europeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/eps.2009.42


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