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dc.contributor.authorKIVIORG, Merilin
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-22T10:12:20Z
dc.date.available2010-12-22T10:12:20Z
dc.date.issued2010-12-22
dc.identifier.issn1830-7728
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/15236
dc.description.abstractWhat should the response be if a religious community (or an affiliated institution) violates the individual rights of either its own members or of others in society? This working paper analyses the UK Jewish Free School case, which raised a question of racial discrimination in the admission policy of the school from a theoretical and international law perspective with focus on the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. The aim is to address broader issues of collective freedom of religion or belief by giving some theoretical conceptualising points about collective religious autonomy. An attempt is also made to provide some hypothetical predictions as to how the JFS case would be decided under the European Court of Human Rights if ever submitted.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWPen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2010/40en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectReligious freedomen
dc.subjectreligious autonomyen
dc.subjectcollective autonomyen
dc.subjectconflict of individual rightsen
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectfaith schoolsen
dc.subjectdenominational schoolsen
dc.titleCollective Religious Autonomy under the European Convention on Human Rights: the UK Jewish Free School Case in International Perspectiveen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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