Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPANCARO, Cosimo
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-21T11:37:07Z
dc.date.available2011-01-21T11:37:07Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationFlorence : European University Institute, 2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/15421
dc.descriptionDefence Date: 17/12/2010en
dc.descriptionExamination Board: Prof. Giancarlo Corsetti, EUI and University of Cambridge, Supervisor Prof. Harris Dellas, University of Bern Dr. Marcel Fratzscher, European Central Bank Prof. Helmut Luetkepohl, EUI
dc.description.abstractThis thesis focuses on three macroeconomic issues in the process of cross-border integration in real and financial markets. The first chapter develops an asymmetric two-country international real business cycle model to analyze the effects of trade and capital liberalization on macroeconomic volatility in emerging markets. In this framework, agents in the emerging market are subject to a constraint a la Kiyotaki on foreign borrowing and the international trade of intermediate inputs is subject to quadratic iceberg costs. The model shows, that in emerging economies, in response to a productivity shock, capital liberalization leads to a worsening of consumption smoothing whereas trade liberalization to an improvement of consumption smoothing. These results are consistent with the empirical evidence provided by Kose, Prasad and Terrones (2003). Then, the second chapter examines the dynamics, the predictors and the costs of current account reversals across diverse de-facto exchange rate regimes in a sample of industrialized economies over the period 1970-2007. This analysis shows that the average patterns of the main macroeconomic variables during the adjustment episodes are not dissimilar across exchange rate systems. Instead, the triggers of current account reversals change across different exchange arrangements. Moreover, this study provides evidence that, against the traditional wisdom, a current account adjustment has a more negative effect on real GDP growth under a more flexible exchange rate regime than under a fixed exchange rate regime. Finally, the third chapter studies the international transmission mechanism of a tradable productivity shock in a two-country two-sector international real business cycle model. In particular, it identifies the conditions under which the predictions of the Balassa-Samuelson theorem hold in a theoretical framework where the real exchange rate is driven both by the movements of the terms of trade and by the deviations of the relative price of non-tradable goods across countries. The model shows that a productivity innovation to the domestic tradable sector always leads to an increase in the relative price of non-tradable goods while the effect on the real exchange rate largely depends on the model parameterization.en
dc.description.tableofcontents-- Macroeconomic volatility after trade and capital account liberalization -- Current account adjustments in industrial countries : does the exchange rate regime matter? -- THE Balassa-Samuelson and the Penn effect : are they really the same?en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Economicsen
dc.subjectMacroeconomicsen
dc.subject.lcshMacroeconomics
dc.subject.lcshInternational economic relations
dc.subject.lcshInternational economic integration
dc.subject.lcshInternational finance
dc.titleThree essays in international macroeconomicsen
dc.typeThesisen
eui.subscribe.skiptrue


Files associated with this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record