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dc.contributor.authorDÜVELL, Franck
dc.contributor.authorVOLLMER, Bastian
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-29T09:37:01Z
dc.date.available2011-03-29T09:37:01Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/16212
dc.descriptionImproving EU and US Immigration Systems' Capacity for Responding to Global Challenges: Learning from experiencesen
dc.description.abstractIrregular migration was first noted during the 1970s, peaked around 2000 and is decreasing, the stock dropped to 3.8 million in 2008 and the flow of clandestine entry dropped to 103,000 apprehensions in 2009. Migration and border controls have been stepped up considerably by the EU and its member states over the past 15 years and were also extended to almost all neighbouring and transit countries along the main routes. Although clandestine entry, notably the arrival of boat people triggers most attention and is high on the policy agenda the overwhelming majority of irregular immigrants enter legally and then overstay, work in breach of their visa limits or otherwise lose their status; others claim asylum, are refused but stay on irregularly.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEU-US Immigration Systemsen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2011/01en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleEuropean Security Challengesen
dc.typeTechnical Report
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