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dc.contributor.authorHEROLD, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-23T13:40:02Z
dc.date.available2011-05-23T13:40:02Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationJournal of consumer policy, 2008, 31, 1, 5-24
dc.identifier.issn0168-7034
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/17384
dc.description.abstractThe country of origin principle, the cornerstone of the EU Television Without Frontiers Directive - to become the Audiovisual Media Services Directive - is often criticised as being insensitive to the legitimate national public interest to protect viewers - and consumers - of audiovisual media content. This paper seeks to demystify this pessimistic perception of the country of origin rule from the perspective of the consumer interest. It demonstrates that the possible negative repercussions of the country of origin logic for consumer welfare are mitigated in three ways: by specific derogations possibilities foreseen in the Directive in case of violations of the fundamental rules on protection of minors and of human dignity; through the margin of broadcasting control left to the Member States in the areas beyond those coordinated by the Directive, and by means of a new two-step anti-circumvention procedure introduced by the new Directive.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectMedia
dc.subjectTelevision
dc.subjectEuropean Union
dc.subjectConsumption
dc.subjectConsumers
dc.subjectPolicy studies
dc.subjectEurope
dc.titleCountry of origin principle in the EU market for audiovisual media services: consumer's friend or foe?
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10603-007-9054-1
dc.identifier.volume31
dc.identifier.startpage5
dc.identifier.endpage24
eui.subscribe.skiptrue
dc.identifier.issue1


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