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dc.contributor.authorKYLE, David J.
dc.contributor.authorGOLDSTEIN, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-15T11:48:32Z
dc.date.available2011-06-15T11:48:32Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/17845
dc.descriptionImproving EU and US Immigration Systems' Capacity for Responding to Global Challenges: Learning from experiencesen
dc.description.abstractThere has been growing attention recently in what has been labeled alternatively the “migration industry,” the business of migration, or migration merchants. This paper describes two of the most significant cases of migration industries facilitating large-scale labor migrations from Ecuador to first, New York City and, then, Spain. We compare the organization and impact of these two separate migration industries and their ability to impact key features of Ecuadorians’ labor mobility and settlement at these two destinations. We discuss the historical context of the sending regions and the policies of the destination states to better understand the conditions under which such migration industries can flourish. We argue for a robust conception of migration industries, comprised of a diverse set of formal and informal economic activities, increasingly able to shape migration patterns and outcomes.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEU-US Immigration Systemsen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2011/15en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleMigration Industries: A Comparison of the Ecuador-US and Ecuador-Spain Casesen
dc.typeTechnical Report
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