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dc.contributor.authorCAMPESI, Giuseppe
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T15:46:53Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T15:46:53Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1028-3625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/19375
dc.description.abstractThe so-called Arab Spring has thrown out of kilter the precarious balance on which the Euro-Mediterranean border-control regime has been built over the years, illustrating the need to set this regime on a new foundation. The breaking point in the crisis came when the flow of migrants landing on Italian shores in Lampedusa took a spike at the beginning of this year. I analyze how the Italian government manufactured the Lampedusa crisis by matching a discursive rhetoric to government strategy, and I highlight how the sovereign prerogative to define emergency was questioned at both a supranational and a subnational level. I also discuss the main assumption behind securitization theory, exploring the complex web of political and institutional relationships involved in the securitization process and illustrating the ambiguity of the security language deployed by the main securitizing actors. Finally, I look at the possible outcomes of the crisis by looking at the interests involved when it comes to reconfiguring the power to define and govern emergency within the framework of the European border-control regime.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI RSCAS
dc.relation.ispartofseries2011/59
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMediterranean Programme Series
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectMigrationen
dc.subjectsecuritizationen
dc.subjectstate of emergencyen
dc.subjectborder controlen
dc.subjecthuman rightsen
dc.titleThe Arab Spring and the Crisis of the European Border Regime: Manufacturing Emergency in the Lampedusa Crisisen
dc.typeWorking Paper
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