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dc.contributor.authorDI BARTOLOMEO, Anna
dc.contributor.authorSALINARI, Giambattista
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-10T14:58:16Z
dc.date.available2012-01-10T14:58:16Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/19821
dc.descriptionImproving EU and US Immigration Systems' Capacity for Responding to Global Challenges: Learning from experiencesen
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes emigration from the United States to the European Union. Few empirical studies have been conducted on this topic and theorization on this type of migration is essentially inexistent. In this paper, we tried to fill this gap and to show how migration between advanced economies is crucial in understanding different and under-researched aspects of international migration. Specifically, the magnitude of migration from the US appears “too large” to be explained through classic migration theories but “too small” when compared to the overall movements originating in other developed countries. As to the main results, the lower migration propensity showed by the US born population compared with that of the population born in other advanced economies seems to be related to its historical evolution: the US has never had mass emigration and US colonialism was historically less relevant, at least compared to Europe. Geographical and cultural proximity assume instead a major relevance in explaining US emigration patterns and magnitude. Focusing on the characteristics of US emigration, we found, that the interplay of various specific forces have created over time a composite profile of this population, which – being characterized by specific and various motivations – looks, generally speaking, heterogeneous. More specifically, the profile of US emigrants in the European Union Member States is, we have found, essentially linked to family formation and to economic integration between EU and US society. We conclude that migration between advanced economies is relevant internationally, but largely ignored at a scientific level. The more interactions between economies are destined to augment, the more an understanding of their consequences for origin and destination countries becomes a priority.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis report was produced for Pilot Projects on Trans-atlantic Methods for Handling Global Challenges in the European Union and the United States, a project funded by the European Commission. The project is conducted jointly by the European University Institute (EUI) and the Migration Policy Institute (MPI). The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of the authors and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the European Union.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEU-US Immigration Systemsen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2011/22en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleMigration from the United States to the European Union: trends and characteristicsen
dc.typeTechnical Report
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