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dc.contributor.authorFINGER, Matthias
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-20T15:03:05Z
dc.date.available2013-02-20T15:03:05Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationTomasz JANOWSKI and Jim DAVIES (eds), ICEGOV '09. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance, New York, The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2009, 1-4en
dc.identifier.isbn9781605586632
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/26004
dc.description.abstractE-Government is often conceived as the next logical step after public sector reform. However, the implications of this step are not always acknowledged. In this paper, I will first recall, how exactly e-government follows the various public sector reform efforts. I will then identify what this exactly means in terms of government's various roles, namely telecommunications infrastructures, software solutions and platforms, and e-government services. For each of these three roles, I will finally detail what exactly is expected from government from a liberal perspective. In conclusion, I will summarize the various roles of government in promoting e-government in terms of an overall e-policy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleE-Gov and Public Sector Reform: What roles for government in e-government?en
dc.typeContribution to booken
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/1693042.1693044


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