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dc.contributor.authorROTHSTEIN, Bo
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-29T14:25:32Z
dc.date.available2014-04-29T14:25:32Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1830-7736
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/31262
dc.descriptionThe lecture was delivered on Wednesday 16 April 2014 at the Badia Fiesolanaen
dc.description.abstractRecently, a public debate has started questioning the relevance of political science. In the United States, public funding for political science research is under attack in the Congress and major newspapers have carried articles about this issue. In this talk, this problem is discussed from a standpoint arguing that most human misery in today’s world, by standard measures of human wellbeing, is caused by the fact that a majority of the world’s population lives under dysfunctional political institutions. It is argued that this is an issue that is ignored in most political science research. This analysis concludes by listing seven reasons (or sins) why political science does not realize the discipline’s potential for being relevant for human well-being.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWP LSen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2014/03en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen
dc.subjectHuman well-beingen
dc.subjectDemocratic governmenten
dc.subjectPolitical institutionsen
dc.subjectCorruptionen
dc.titleHuman well-being and the lost relevance of political scienceen
dc.typeOtheren
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