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dc.contributor.authorAKHAVAN, Payam
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-19T17:59:49Z
dc.date.available2014-12-19T17:59:49Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationJournal of international criminal justice, 2013, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 527-536
dc.identifier.issn1478-1387
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/33897
dc.description.abstractThe era of romanticization of international criminal justice, ushered in during the 1990s is over. As romance fades, we are confronted with grim reality: the constraints and complexities of international criminal justice, the selectivity, the price tag, the inordinate length of international trials. Yet, the goals and objectives of international criminal justice must be (re)defined in order to assess success or failure. Success is when the International Criminal Court (ICC) remains idle: by preventing the commission of mass atrocities in the first place, and by empowering national jurisdictions. Reconciliation, on the other hand, can be no more than an incidental outcome of international criminal justice, not its purpose. All in all, there is a need to creatively confront the challenges the ICC's normative empire faces today, for international criminal justice to rise again with adjusted expectations.
dc.language.isoEn
dc.publisherOxford Univ Press
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of international criminal justice
dc.titleThe rise, and fall, and rise, of International Criminal Justice
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jicj/mqt028
dc.identifier.volume11
dc.identifier.startpage527
dc.identifier.endpage536
eui.subscribe.skiptrue
dc.identifier.issue3


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