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dc.contributor.authorMIROUDOT, Sébastien
dc.contributor.authorNORDSTRÖM, Håkan
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-10T09:37:41Z
dc.date.available2015-09-10T09:37:41Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1028-3625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/36836
dc.description.abstractIn the past five years, the concept of “global value chain” (GVC) has become popular to describe the way firms fragment production into different stages located in different economies. The “made in the world” narrative suggests that production today is global with inputs coming from all parts of the world before being assembled into final products also shipped all over the world. The empirical basis of this story has however been questioned, suggesting that supply chains are regional rather than global. In this paper we offer a comprehensive review of the evidence based on the World Input-Output Database (WIOD), including new indicators counting the number of domestic and foreign production stages, border crossings and geographic length of the supply chains. The study covers 1995 to 2011. All evidence points in the same direction. The made in the world narrative is correct as far as the direction is concerned, but we still have a long way to go. On average, globalization proceeds at 40 kilometres a year.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI RSCASen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2015/60en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGlobal Governance Programme-183en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGlobal Economicsen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectFragmentation of productionen
dc.subjectVertical specializationen
dc.subjectGlobal value chainen
dc.subjectF14en
dc.subjectL16en
dc.subjectL23en
dc.subject.otherTrade, investment and international cooperation
dc.titleMade in the world?en
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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