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dc.contributor.authorJACHTENFUCHS, Markus
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-28T13:35:35Z
dc.date.available2016-07-28T13:35:35Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier.citationAldershot : Ashgate, 1996, Avebury studies in green researchen
dc.identifier.isbn9781859721735
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/42864
dc.description.abstractThe central idea of this study is a simple one. It is to develop the argument that action must be explained by the way actors reflect about a problem. The study argues that those reflections and their consequences for action can be described in systematic ways. Behind this basic statement lies a fundamental assumption: Besides analysing the interests, preferences and strategies of actors and the resulting interaction, it is at least equally important to study the emergence of these interests, preferences and strategies. In other words, it is important to examine not only how actors get what they want but also why they want what they want. Systematic patterns of reflection, this is the thesis, are at the basis of interests, preferences and strategies.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAshgateen
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/5157
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleInternational policy-making as a learning process? : the European Union and the greenhouse effecten
dc.typeBooken
eui.subscribe.skiptrue
dc.description.versionPublished version of EUI PhD thesis, 1994


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