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dc.contributor.authorPOELHEKKE, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2006-04-21T13:03:00Z
dc.date.available2006-04-21T13:03:00Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.issn1725-6704
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/4348
dc.description.abstractThe share of skilled workers in urban populations has steadily increased since 1970 in US metropolitan areas, but more in some cities than in others. A higher concentration of skills is a sought after asset for cities as it affects population growth positively, also when the initial share is instrumented for by using land-grant colleges. However, skilled cities may attract more skilled workers, but not because they are more skilled initially: increasing returns are rejected when controlling for fixed effects and bias due to inclusion of a lagged dependent variable. Several amenities such as a low-skilled personal service sector do affect the concentration of skills positively. Although firms seem to benefit from externalities, there is no convincing case for an effect on the concentration of college graduates in a city.en
dc.format.extent2494035 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean University Institute
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI ECOen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2006/10en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjecturban and city growthen
dc.subjecthuman capitalen
dc.subjectskillsen
dc.subjectspilloversen
dc.subjectexternalitiesen
dc.subjectconcentrationen
dc.subjectdiversityen
dc.subjectamenitiesen
dc.titleDo Amenities and Diversity Encourage City Growth? A Link Through Skilled Laboren
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.neeo.contributorPOELHEKKE|Steven|aut|
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