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dc.contributor.authorLEAL, Hugo
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-29T15:29:23Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationFlorence : European University Institute, 2017en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/49126
dc.descriptionDefence date: 27 November 2017en
dc.descriptionExamining Board: Professor Donatella della Porta, European University Institute; Professor Hanspeter Kriesi, European University Institute; Professor Maha Abdelrahman, University of Cambridge; Professor Mario Diani, Università degli Studi di Trentoen
dc.description.abstractIn broad terms, this research is inspired by the founding questions of social movement studies: what triggers the process of recruitment, mobilisation and spread that leads to the demise or success of collective action? In particular, I was puzzled by the mobilisation and emergence of Egyptian contentious actors: how and why collective action evolved in the country from seemingly random and disconnected events and agents? Using Egypt as a case-study and the first decade of the twenty-first century as time frame, I set to solve this puzzle and find an answer to the leading research question: Does the emergence of Collective Action Networks in Egypt explain the increasing levels of contention and, ultimately, the 25 January uprising? This question focuses on the topic that gives title to the thesis, which is the relation between the hypothetical emergence of CANs and 1) a phase of heightened contention from 2000 to 2011 and 2) the revolutionary situation of 25 January, 2011. It also provides the basis to assess the manifestation of the two other relational patterns that appear in the subtitle of the thesis, namely dynamic protest waves and mobilisation spirals. In addressing the research question, I mixed quantitative and qualitative methods, combining protest event data collection and analysis, social network analysis with interviews. This allowed me to test if, how and why Collective Action Networks emerged and whether the revolutionary situation of 25 January 2011 was an unexpected spontaneous uprising or the natural outcome of a decade of sustained mobilisation. The main finding of this thesis is that, indeed, the intensification of contentious action in Egypt, between 2000 and 2011, was the product an emergent and increasingly complex Collective Action Network that stirred up protest waves and mobilisation spirals thus determining the Egyptian 25 January revolution.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Political and Social Sciencesen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccessen
dc.subject.lcshProtest movements -- Egypt
dc.subject.lcshInternet -- Political aspects -- Egypt
dc.subject.lcshInternet and activism -- Egypt
dc.subject.lcshSocial media -- Political aspects -- Egypt
dc.subject.lcshSocial media -- Political aspects -- Egypt
dc.titleThe emergence of collective action networks : dynamic protest waves and mobilisation spirals in Egypten
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/158913
dc.embargo.terms2021-11-27
dc.date.embargo2021-11-27


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