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dc.contributor.authorDEHOUSSE, Renaud
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-16T08:31:08Z
dc.date.available2018-03-16T08:31:08Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.citationWest European politics, 1995, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 118-136en
dc.identifier.issn0140-2382
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/52445
dc.descriptionPublished online: 03 Dec 2007en
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, the weakness of the European Parliament and of European political parties is presented as a central cause of the European Community's legitimacy crisis. This article suggests an alternative reading of the situation. Not only is the legitimacy crisis much more complex than is generally believed, but the strengthening of the Parliament, and the development of party politics that would ensue might ultimately threaten the stability of the Community. The experience of parliamentary federations suggests that the majoritarian features of the parliamentary system may be a source of tension. No matter how necessary the democratisation of the EC's institutional setting may be, reforms must not be detrimental to the quality of centre-periphery relations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofWest European politicsen
dc.titleConstitutional reform in the European Community : are there alternatives to the majoritarian avenue?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01402389508425094
dc.identifier.doi1743-9655
dc.identifier.volume18en
dc.identifier.startpage118en
dc.identifier.endpage136en
dc.identifier.issue3en


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