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dc.contributor.authorSCHMITZ, Hans Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-09T09:22:27Z
dc.date.available2006-06-09T09:22:27Z
dc.date.created1999en
dc.date.issued1999en
dc.identifier.citationFlorence, European University Institute, 1999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/5379
dc.descriptionDefence date: 11 June 1999
dc.descriptionExamining board: Prof. Thomas Risse (European University Institute - supervisor); Prof. Philippe C. Schmitter (European University Institute); Prof. Volker Rittberger (Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen); Dr. Stefan Mair (Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik, Ebenhausen)
dc.descriptionFirst made available online 12 September 2017
dc.description.abstractThe subject of the study is regime change understood as the modification of broadly defined political institutions and practices governing domestic politics. Democratization is a possible outcome of such a process if the modification of political institutions and practices reflects convergence with a particular set of liberal ideas and norms. During the last 25 years the interest of political scientists in such processes has steadily grown. Democratization spread from Southern Europe in the 1970s to Latin America in the 1980s and finally reached Eastern Europe and the other continents in the late 1980s and early 1990s. More recently, some have diagnosed an 'ebbing' of the wave. While the empirical record of the 'third wave' is mixed, its profound effects on the way the academic community studies democratization are undeniable. The new cases o f democratization led during the 1980s to a paradigm shift away from structuralist explanations towards more contingency-driven and agency-based approaches. Challenges to the modernization school or cultural explanations of democratic change highlighted cases of regime change under structurally unfavorable conditions and called for greater attention towards the role of political actors, institutions, and contingencies.
dc.format.mediumPaperen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Political and Social Sciencesen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject.lcshHuman rights -- Kenia
dc.subject.lcshHuman rights -- Uganda
dc.titleGlobal norms and regime change : Kenya and Uganda in comparative perspectiveen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/776311
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