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dc.contributor.authorKHAZANOV, Pavel
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-11T14:36:04Z
dc.date.available2018-07-11T14:36:04Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1830-7728
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/56744
dc.description.abstractIn his writings, the first Soviet critic of television, Vladimir Sappak (1921-1961) associates the new mass medium with a political vision typical of Soviet intelligentsia in the Thaw era: the project of transcendence of Stalinism and its legacy. This project had to be pursued within the context of Soviet Party censorship, which made it difficult to articulate what post-Stalinism would entail. My paper analyzes Sappak’s understanding of television’s sincerity– a key attribute of the medium, according to his influential monograph, Television and Us (1963, published posthumously). I argue that Sappak’s TV sincerity in fact articulates an understanding of Soviet humanism, which, I claim, was a culturally important post-Stalinist mass ideology, whose boundaries and effects were negotiated in a contest between the Party state, the creative and scientific intelligentsia, and the urbanized, educated, TV-watching Soviet consumer masses.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWPen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2018/04en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectUSSRen
dc.subjectThawen
dc.subjectSincerityen
dc.subjectIntelligentsiaen
dc.subjectDestalinizationen
dc.titleVladimir Sappak’s humanism on Soviet TVen
dc.typeWorking Paperen


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