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dc.contributor.authorPISANI-FERRY, Jean
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T09:32:34Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T09:32:34Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1028-3625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/60067
dc.description.abstractTwo decades after the high point of global governance in the mid-1990s, hopes that globalisation would be buttressed by a system of global rules and a network of specialised global institutions have been dashed by a series of setbacks. This retreat from multilateralism can be attributed in part to political developments in individual countries. But such factors hide a series specific roadblocks to global governance: the growing number and diversity of countries involved; the mounting rivalry between the US and China; doubts about globalisation and the distribution of the associated benefits; the obsolescence of global rules and institutions; imbalances within the global governance regime; and increased complexity. Demand for global governance has not diminished, but support for binding multilateral arrangements has. Thus, the narrow path ahead is to establish a sufficient, critical multilateral base for flexible arrangements and to equip policymakers with a precise toolkit for determining, on a field-by-field basis, the minimum requirements for effective collective action.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI RSCASen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2018/65en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectGlobal governanceen
dc.subjectMultilateralismen
dc.subjectPublic goodsen
dc.subjectCollective actionen
dc.subjectInternational organizationen
dc.titleShould we give up on global governance?en
dc.typeWorking Paperen


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