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dc.contributor.authorKRATOCHWIL, Friedrich
dc.contributor.authorPETROVSKY, Vladimir
dc.contributor.authorLANC, Erwin
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-21T11:21:00Z
dc.date.available2006-07-21T11:21:00Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationLeiden Journal of International Law, 2003, 16, 4, 873-895.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/6162
dc.description.abstractAmong many goals which governments and individuals always pursue, the broadest and most common is security. It is the basic context in which most other values are enjoyed, in the expectation that they will last for a long time. However, the meaning of security has always been ambiguous. At the end of the twentieth century the world held great promise: the Cold War was over and we hoped to see a peaceful, secure future after the century of interstate conflicts, taking full advantage of globalization and minimizing its negative effects. Now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, new challenges to security are looming over the horizon. We are facing today the emergence of a global society, which crosses national borders and makes the world closer economically and technologically.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofLeiden Journal of International Law
dc.titleSecurity: New Threats and New Strategiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.neeo.contributorKRATOCHWIL|Friedrich|aut|
dc.neeo.contributorPETROVSKY|Vladimir|aut|
dc.neeo.contributorLANC|Erwin|aut|
dc.identifier.volume16
dc.identifier.startpage873
dc.identifier.endpage895
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