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dc.contributor.authorMUKOMEL, Vladimir
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-16T14:07:58Z
dc.date.available2019-05-16T14:07:58Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/62860
dc.description.abstractWhile xenophobic sentiments are always present in a society1 Whom is xenophobia directed against? How are migrant-phobias related to xenophobia? What are the hidden underlying factors behind the rise of xenophobia and the aggression towards the “others”? Is there a connection between the prevalence of xenophobia and the functioning of social institutions and social setting? , they have become widespread in the 2000s. In 2002-2012, the share of respondents who do not feel hostility towards representatives of other nationalities decreased by over a quarter. The slogan "Russia for the Russians", which is supported not only by the Russians, but also by the representatives of the traditional minorities within Russia, has been increasingly popular in the 2000s. In November 2012, only 23% of the respondents reacted negatively to it, considering it properly fascist - as opposed to 30% in 1998 (Levada Centre in 2012a, p.176, 179).en
dc.description.sponsorshipConsortium for Applied Research on International Migration (CARIM-East) is co-financed by the European University Institute and the European Union
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMigration Policy Centreen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCARIM-Easten
dc.relation.ispartofseriesExplanatory Notesen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2013/97en
dc.relation.urihttp://www.migrationpolicycentre.eu/
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectMigration
dc.subjectXenophobia
dc.subjectStatistical data
dc.titleXenophobia and migrant-phobias in Russia : origins and challengesen
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
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