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dc.contributor.authorADLER, David
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-19T11:51:32Z
dc.date.available2019-09-19T11:51:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationIPPR progressive review, 2019, Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 188-195en
dc.identifier.issn2573-2323
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/64204
dc.descriptionFirst published: 08 August 2019en
dc.description.abstractHow can we force a shift in culture to face the challenges of the future? Green New Deals abound. From Malaga to Manchester, activists and their political affiliates are advancing proposals for a rapid green transition. On the policy content, few agree. Some advocates of a Green New Deal emphasize the role of the private sector, while others call for its expropriation. Some view it as a slingshot toward a technologically advanced future, while others view it a guide back to a more bucolic past. But across all the strands of the Green New Deal movement, there is broad consensus that staving off extinction will require a fundamental shift in the way we produce, consume, and coexist.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Online Libraryen
dc.relation.ispartofIPPR progressive reviewen
dc.titleKulturindustrie and the Green New Dealen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/newe.12157
dc.identifier.volume26en
dc.identifier.startpage188en
dc.identifier.endpage195en
dc.identifier.issue2en


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