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dc.contributor.authorBAUBÖCK, Rainer
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-26T15:51:00Z
dc.date.available2021-08-24T02:45:13Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationCitizenship studies, 2021, Vol. 24, No. 3, pp. 389-403en
dc.identifier.issn1362-1025
dc.identifier.issn1469-3593
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/66287
dc.descriptionFirst published online: 24 February 2020en
dc.description.abstractThis epilogue to the special issue of Citizenship Studies reflects on the connections between states’ powers to deport foreigners and to denationalise citizens and asks how both powers ought to be hedged in by liberal and democratic constraints. The article argues that citizenship revocation powers are ultimately at odds with a democratic principle that governments are collectively authorised by citizens. It suggests also that the protection of long-term foreign residents from deportation is due to the emergence of a quasi-citizenship status for denizens in liberal democracies. Finally, the article raises a question about the future of the power to expel in increasingly mobile and interconnected societies. Could the proliferation of multiple citizenships and the increasing number of people with multiple residences in different countries undermine the justifications for strong constraints on the state power to expel proposed by the contributions in this volume?en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.ispartofCitizenship studiesen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleA free movement paradox : denationalisation and deportation in mobile societiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13621025.2020.1733256
dc.identifier.volume24en
dc.identifier.startpage389en
dc.identifier.endpage403en
eui.subscribe.skiptrue
dc.identifier.issue3en
dc.embargo.terms2021-08-24


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