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dc.contributor.authorHERZOG, Dagmar
dc.contributor.otherMEISSNER, Fran
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-01T14:48:07Z
dc.date.available2020-12-01T14:48:07Z
dc.date.created2014-12-10
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/69064
dc.descriptionLecture delivered at the European University Institute in Florence on 10 December 2014
dc.descriptionA video interview with the presenter was recorded on 11 December 2014
dc.description.abstractThe heyday of intellectual and popular preoccupation with psychoanalysis in the West reached from the 1940s to the 1970s, from post-Nazism through Cold War consumerism to the anti-Vietnam War movement and the sexual revolution. In each country the ensuing debates over the truth about how human beings are took unique form. Only in West Germany did debates about the value of psychoanalysis as a system of thought circle so intensely around the question of whether or not aggression was an ineradicable aspect of the human animal and whether or not it might best be conceived as a “drive” comparable in strength and form to libido. This paper analyzes the wholly unexpected consequences set in motion by the publication of ethologist Konrad Lorenz’s On Aggression, not only on the oeuvre of the preeminent West German psychoanalyst Alexander Mitscherlich, but also on the eventual shape taken by the New Left’s politics and theories of human nature
dc.format.extent00:46:15
dc.publisherEuropean University Instituteen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMWPen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVideo Lectureen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2014/07en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/34404
dc.relation.urihttps://youtu.be/eanNkdCCJqk
dc.titleOn aggression : psychoanalysis as moral politics in post-Nazi Germany
dc.typeVideoen
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