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dc.contributor.authorDIGOL, Diana
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-10T15:35:29Z
dc.date.available2007-07-10T15:35:29Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationFlorence, European University Institute, 2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/6941
dc.descriptionDefence date: 23 March 2007
dc.descriptionExamining board: Prof. John Hemery (Centre for Political and Diplomatic Studies, Oxford) ; Prof. Jacek Wasilewski (Warsaw School of Social Psychology) ; Prof. Jaap Dronkers (European University Institute)(Supervisor)
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study is to explore the process of diplomatic elite transformation in the post-communist countries within the context of political elite transformation and to analyse whether the process of circulation or reproduction prevailed among the diplomatic elites during the first decade and a half after the change of the political regime (1989-2004). I focus upon the entry-level diplomats to a greater degree than in the older works on political elite and diplomacy. The key to capturing the process of circulation/ reproduction among diplomatic elites is through analysis of the general characteristics of diplomats as well as the system of personnel selection. I argue that a better understanding of the transformation processes could be achieved by looking at people at the entry level into political elite, i.e., by looking at newcomers. The thesis is further set out to show how the historical, political and cultural legacy of the past and geographical realities shaped the emerging diplomatic elites. The analysis presented in the thesis is based on a survey that I conducted. Several conclusions can be drawn from the analysis of diplomats in 27 countries. The composition of the emerging diplomatic elite across countries shows some striking similarities and some striking differences. The areas of important similarities are education, social origins and channels of recruitment. The differences mainly occur in age, gender, recruitment channels, previous professional experience, type of residence and additional jobs performed. Particularly illuminating in this respect is the division of respondents by geographical criterion into the CEE/FSU countries. A more meticulous analysis shows that the revolutionary political transformations were not followed by a revolutionary transformation of elites, or of diplomatic elites in particular. There was a modest degree of circulation from the lower classes into the elite role (in particular, into the diplomatic elite), but it did not transcend the socially desirable and socially stabilising moderate level. It was certainly not a revolutionary degree of circulation into the diplomatic elite. Nor was there a full-scale reproduction of elites.en
dc.format.extent1184426 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Political and Social Sciencesen
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/14921
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject.lcshElite (Social sciences) -- Europe, Eastern
dc.subject.lcshDiplomats -- Europe, Eastern
dc.subject.lcshPost-communism -- Social aspects -- Europe, Eastern
dc.titleEmerging Diplomatic Elites in Post-Communist Europeen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/53355
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