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dc.contributor.authorAWUAPILA, Nathan Tyohemba
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-23T08:46:24Z
dc.date.available2021-02-23T08:46:24Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/70197
dc.descriptionPublished on 23 February 2021en
dc.description.abstractCOVID-19 has been devastating globally, but growing evidence indicates that emerging countries are suffering and will continue to suffer the health, social and economic effects of the pandemic more acutely and longer into the future. Massive vaccination campaigns, alongside the implementation of large-scale economic and social recovery measures, will be key to getting the virus and its effects under control. Importantly, efforts across Africa are challenged by infrastructural issues that do not always meet the eye. More specifically, electricity, which is imperative for correctly storing the vaccine at low temperatures, is still lacking for large populations across the continent, in both rural and urban areas, especially in the sub-Saharan region.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean University Instituteen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUIdeasen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBlogposten
dc.relation.ispartofseries2021en
dc.relation.ispartofseries[STG]en
dc.relation.urihttps://euideas.eui.eu/2021/02/23/vaccination-campaigns-on-ice-why-electricity-deficits-in-africa-hamper-the-distribution-of-covid-19-vaccines/en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectCovid-19en
dc.subjectCOVID-19en
dc.subjectCoronavirusen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectElectricity deficiten
dc.titleVaccination campaigns on ice : why electricity deficits in Africa hamper the distribution of COVID-19 vaccinesen
dc.typeOtheren


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