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dc.contributor.authorPOLLACK, Mark A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-21T10:03:20Z
dc.date.available2021-05-21T10:03:20Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationJournal of common market studies, 2001, Vol. 39, No. 2, pp. 221-244en
dc.identifier.issn0021-9886
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/71334
dc.descriptionFirst published: 16 December 2002en
dc.description.abstractThe explicit effort to theorize about the process of European integration began within the field of international relations (IR), where neofunctionalism and intergovernmentalism long remained the dominant schools of thought, With the relaunching of the integration process in the 1980s and 1990s, however, IR scholars have begun to approach the study of the European Union using more general, and generalizable, theoretical approaches. This article examines the recent debate among realists, liberals, rational-choice institutionalists, and constructivists regarding the nature of the integration process and the EU as an international organization. Although originally posed as competing theories, I argue, realist, liberal and institutionalist approaches show signs of convergence around a single rationalist model, with constructivism remaining as the primary rival, but less developed, approach to the study of European integration.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of common market studiesen
dc.relation.isbasedonhttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/1695
dc.titleInternational relations theory and European integration
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1468-5965.00286
dc.identifier.volume39
dc.identifier.startpage221
dc.identifier.endpage244
eui.subscribe.skiptrue
dc.identifier.issue2
dc.description.versionThe article is a published version of EUI RSC WP; 2000/55


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