Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGLENCROSS, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-14T11:58:44Z
dc.date.available2008-01-14T11:58:44Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationFlorence, European University Institute, 2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/7766
dc.descriptionDefence date: 28 May 2007
dc.descriptionExamining board: Prof. Friedrich Kratochwil, European University Institute (Supervisor) ; Prof. Daniel Deudney, Johns Hopkins University ; Prof. Sergio Fabbrini, Università degli Studi di Trento ; Prof. Alexander H. Trechsel, European University Institute
dc.description.abstractAs a novel and complex polity, also subject to endless proposals for institutional reform, the viability of the EU is an open but under-theorized question. This thesis conceptualizes EU viability from an internal perspective, that is, the viability of the process of integration rather than Europe as a viable actor in international politics. Adopting the concept of a compound polity to understand the tensions inherent in the EU, viability is defined in relation to the -rules of the game- of this compound system. This gambit has a twofold purpose. Firstly, it permits an analogy with another historical case of a compound system, the antebellum US republic. Secondly, it enables the specification of two scenarios of viability in a compound polity: dynamic equilibrium and voluntary centralization. Four aspects of the rules of the game (institutions, expectations, competence allocation and representative functions) are analysed to determine which scenario the EU follows. The analogy with the early US and its own conflicts over these four elements of the rules of the game is then contrasted with the EU experience. Five differences in how these disputes arise and the means for trying to settle them are singled out to explain the differing problems of viability in both compound polities. The results of this analogical analysis are then used to explore the appropriateness of certain proposed changes to the rules of the game in the EU, notably in the area of political representation. In a system accustomed to dynamic equilibrium, enhancing the representation of individuals is often seen as a condition for favouring more voluntary centralization. However, the analysis of conflicts over the rules of the game in two compound systems suggests a more cautious approach is required in the interests of viability. Hence this study presents itself as a significant, if incomplete, initial step in the process of identifying what makes the EU viable.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Political and Social Sciencesen
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/23918
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject.lcshEuropean Union -- Politics and government
dc.subject.lcshPolitical science -- European Union countries
dc.subject.lcshEuropean Union
dc.subject.lcshEuropean federation
dc.subject.lcshPolitical culture -- United States -- History -- 19th century
dc.subject.lcshEurope -- Economic integration -- Political aspects
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Politics and government -- 1783-1865
dc.titleE Pluribus Europa? Assessing the Viability of the EUen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/11888


Files associated with this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record