Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLEE MUDGE, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-25T10:05:38Z
dc.date.available2008-07-25T10:05:38Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.issn1830-7728
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/9108
dc.description.abstractNeoliberalism is oft invoked but ill-defined in the social sciences. This paper develops a tripartite definition of neoliberalism using tools from institutionalism and field theory. It argues that neoliberalism is a sui generis ideological system born of historical processes of struggle and collaboration in three worlds: intellectual, bureaucratic, and political. Among neoliberalism’s three ‘faces,’ its mode as a form of politics has received the least attention. To fill this gap, I develop a definition of neoliberal politics as struggles over political authority that are bounded by a particularly market-centric set of ideas about the state’s responsibilities, the locus of state authority, and the state’s central constituencies. Given that social democratic politics were particularly powerful in Western Europe for much of the postwar period, neoliberalism among the mainstream parties of the European left deserves particular attention.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWPen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2008/34en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectNeoliberalismen
dc.subjecteconomic thoughten
dc.subjectinstitutionalismen
dc.subjectpolitical economyen
dc.subjectintellectualsen
dc.subjectleft politicsen
dc.titleNeoliberalism’s Three Facesen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
eui.subscribe.skiptrue


Files associated with this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record