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dc.contributor.authorCURTIN, Deirdre
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T10:03:10Z
dc.date.available2011-09-23T10:03:10Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1830-7736
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/18641
dc.descriptionThe lecture was delivered on Wednesday 16 March 2011en
dc.description.abstractThe concept of secrecy as a mechanism for not providing government information, on the one hand, and the commitment to openness of government, on the other, reflect certain historical understandings of the relationship between a government, citizens, officials and information. Within democratic systems of government secrecy has been an essential ingredient irrespective of the existence or otherwise of a written Constitution (eg. US and the UK). The transparency ‘explosion’ of recent decades both in rhetoric and in law has been matched by a parallel growth in secrecy regulation and practice at all levels of government, including, in Europe, supranational government (the EU). Leaking has always had a symbiotic relationship with secrecy. What has changed in the information age is that (leaked) information can be shared right across the globe through the Internet in an unstoppable fashion (Wikileaks). This lecture focuses on the understudied phenomenon of government secrecy, its nature, structure, categories and its multiple layers. These are explored from the perspective of (representative) democracy and of constitutional law. The basic argument is that secrets can be protected more effectively and more legitimately if government secrecy is reduced overall. This will mean more ‘shallow’ (less deep) secrets, refining access control and introducing second order disclosure requirements in the context of institutional checks and balances.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI MWP LSen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2011/07en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectSecrecyen
dc.subjectopennessen
dc.subjectleakingen
dc.subjectnational securityen
dc.subjectadministrative rationaleen
dc.subjectEuropean Unionen
dc.subjectinternal securityen
dc.subjectchecks and balancesen
dc.titleKeeping Government Secrecy Safe: Beyond Whack-a-Moleen
dc.typeOtheren
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