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dc.contributor.authorPIEBALGS, Andris
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-26T09:58:48Z
dc.date.available2009-02-26T09:58:48Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.issn1028-3625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/10747
dc.description.abstractIt is clear that we are at the beginning of what has correctly been called the "third industrial revolution" - the rapid development of an entirely new energy system. We can expect a massive shift towards a carbon-free electricity system, huge pressure to reduce energy consumption and transport on the basis of renewable electricity. To make this shift in a manner that maintains, and in fact increases the EU's competitiveness, means that stimulating rapid technological development in these areas has to be a central part of the EU's energy policy. Indeed, this is at the heart of the question: how can the EU turn the challenges of climate change and energy security into an opportunity?en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI RSCASen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2009/11en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLoyola de Palacio Programme on Energy Policyen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectEuropean Energy Policyen
dc.subjectSecurity of Supplyen
dc.subjectClimate Changeen
dc.subjectLow Carbon Economyen
dc.subjectStrategic Energy Reviewen
dc.subjectTechnological Innovationen
dc.titleHow the European Union is preparing the "Third Industrial Revolution" with an innovative energy policyen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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