Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDRAEGE, Jonas Bergan
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-12T13:38:59Z
dc.date.available2021-09-05T02:45:08Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationFlorence : European University Institute, 2017en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/47926
dc.descriptionDefence date: 05 September 2017en
dc.descriptionExamining Board: Professor Donatella Della Porta, Scuola Normale Superiore (EUI Supervisor); Professor Hanspeter Kriesi, European University Institute; Professor Ali Çarkoğlu, Koç University; Professor Katrin Uba, Uppsala Universityen
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores how Turkey's political parties responded to the Gezi Park protests in 2012. I assess how four political parties framed the protests, whether the latter were accompanied by changes in the parties' platforms and priorities, and whether politicians in office adjusted practical policies to accommodate protest demands. In this research I draw on original data of parliamentary interventions, budget allocations, semi-structured interviews, and secondary sources, to answer these questions. The Gezi protests received a great deal of attention from politicians, especially from the two opposition parties closest to the protests, the CHP and the BDP. However, both parties responded to the demands that aligned best with their pre-existing agendas, and with different loci of attention. The protests were also met with practical concessions on a few specific demands. Yet these policy responses were narrowly targeted at the object and symbol of the initial protests rather than at their underlying grievances. Consequently, I argue that the responses from the CHP and the BDP were supportive, but limited. There was a policy response, but it did not go very deep. There was a platform response, but it framed the demands in the direction of pre-existing platforms. There was an organisational response and a response in terms of electoral strategies, but many of these were symbolic, and not accompanied by major changes in party platforms. In this sense, it may be useful to talk about the institutional response to the Gezi protest as a creative process for these two political parties. When party representatives spoke about the protests, they highlighted those issues where their party already had ownership. Furthermore, while the BDP supported several of the protesters’ demands, the CHP was more supportive of the protest actors themselves. I use this finding to suggest an extension of the concept of the protest paradigm in the social movement literature. Until now the protest paradigm has mainly been used to describe how antagonists of protests delegitimize protests, whereas I suggest that it is also is a possible strategy for supportive actors. This novel use of the protest paradigm is a main contribution of this thesis. More generally, the thesis combines the literature on social movement outcomes and party politics, and contributes to an expansion of studies of social movement outcomes to cases outside the area of Western liberal democracies.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI PhD thesesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDepartment of Political and Social Sciencesen
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/44949
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subject.lcshProtest movements -- Turkey
dc.subject.lcshSocial movements -- Turkey
dc.subject.lcshPolitical parties -- Turkey
dc.subject.lcshTurkey -- Politics and government -- 21st century
dc.titleThe aftermath of Turkey's Gezi protests : how political parties respond to social movementsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.2870/162521
dc.embargo.terms2021-09-05
dc.description.versionChapter 6 ‘Party changes following the Gezi protests' of the PhD thesis draws upon an earlier version published as an article 'Social movements within organisations : occupy parties in Italy and Turkey' (2016) in the journal ‘South European society and politics’


Files associated with this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record