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dc.contributor.authorBOBROVA, Anastacia
dc.contributor.authorSHAKHOTSKA, Liudmila
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-16T14:06:39Z
dc.date.available2019-05-16T14:06:39Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/62693
dc.description.abstractDefining and thus measuring circular migration is a difficult task. Its definition is far from clear either at an academic or at the political level. In a comprehensive article Newland (2009) tries to identify all definitional issues by summarizing four dimensions which have been used to approach circular migration schemes: 1. spatial, which involves both the origin and the destination country; 2. temporal, which includes both short and long term movements; 3. iterative, including more than one cycle; and 4. developmental, describing a win-win-win process implying benefits for the country of origin, the country of destination and the migrant himself. When trying to measure this phenomenon, Belarus faces specific challenges as, at the time of writing, neither comprehensive statistics nor ad hoc surveys capture one specific trait of circularity, namely its repetitiveness.en
dc.description.sponsorshipConsortium for Applied Research on International Migration (CARIM-East) is co-financed by the European University Institute and the European Union
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMigration Policy Centreen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCARIM-Easten
dc.relation.ispartofseriesExplanatory Notesen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2012/81en
dc.relation.urihttp://www.migrationpolicycentre.eu/
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.subjectDemography
dc.subjectEconomics
dc.subjectCircular migration
dc.titleThe demographic and economic framework of circular migration in Belarusen
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
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