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dc.contributor.authorDEL SARTO, Raffaella A.
dc.coverage.spatialEurope
dc.coverage.spatialMediterranean
dc.coverage.temporal1995-2016
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-16T15:43:22Z
dc.date.available2019-10-16T15:43:22Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.otherEUI_ResData_00003_RSC
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1814/64588
dc.description4 data files (ZIP compressed)
dc.description.abstractAcross different sectors, relations between the EU and MENA countries range from loose cooperation to the adoption of EU rules in specific sectors by a third country. The following aspects of cooperation were considered: The legal framework; Constituting the basis of cooperation, the legal dimension comprises framework agreements (such as the Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreement) but also specific agreements and arrangements. Examples of the latter include agreements stipulating cooperation of a MENA country with an EU regulatory agency, which expresses a rather high degree of convergence. Specific agreements may also be limited to one sector, such as agreements on the exchange of information as far the field of security is concerned, agreements related to readmission in the field of migration, or free trade agreements and related protocols. Activities: Activities range from the participation of single MENA countries in the EU’s CSDP missions to a variety of cooperation programmes and projects in different fields. Most of these programmes aim at expanding EU rules and practices by mainly providing training and technical assistance to the partner countries. Examples include EuroMed cooperation programmes, training programmes that are coordinated through EuropeAid and may involve different national and international agencies, TAIEX activities, and different training activities in a sub-regional or international framework. Other relevant agreements and activities: Some agreements and activities may not take place within the EU framework, but must be considered because of their relevance for EU-MENA cooperation in specific sectors. Participation in NATO’s Mediterranean Dialogue or in NATO’s ‘Operation Active Endeavour’ patrolling the Mediterranean Sea serves as examples here, with NATO being indispensable for EU security. Sources: Legal documents, such as Association Agreements concluded between the EU and third countries information on cooperation activities between the EU and third countries, for example training activities conducted within the framework of EuroMed migration and the AENEAS programme, initiated by the EU Commission in 2005.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEuropean University Institute, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studiesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEUI Research Dataen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2017en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRobert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studiesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBORDERLANDSen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectStatistical data
dc.subjectExternal relations
dc.subjectEuropean Union
dc.subject.classificationFS-CA
dc.subject.ddc327
dc.subject.lcshMediterranean policy -- Europe
dc.subject.lcshEurope -- Foreign relations -- Mediterranean region
dc.titleBORDERLANDS dataset
dc.typeDataset
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dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International 


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International