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dc.contributor.authorCOVIELLO, Decio
dc.contributor.authorICHINO, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorPERSICO, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-10T16:07:47Z
dc.date.available2020-02-10T16:07:47Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationJournal of law & economics, 2019, Vol. 62, No. 3, pp. 403-426en
dc.identifier.issn0022-2186
dc.identifier.issn1537-5285
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1814/66025
dc.descriptionAvailable online August 2019en
dc.description.abstractWe estimate the productivity effects of labor specialization using a judicial environment that offers a quasi-experimental setting well suited to this purpose. Judges in this environment are randomly assigned many different types of cases. This assignment generates random streaks of same-type cases, which creates minispecialization events unrelated to the characteristics of judges or cases. We estimate that when judges receive more cases of a certain type, they become faster, that is, more likely to close cases of that type in any one of the corresponding hearings. Quality, as measured by probability of an appeal, is not negatively affected.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCanada Research Chairs programen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniv Chicago Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of law & economicsen
dc.titleMeasuring the gains from labor specializationen
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/704244
dc.identifier.volume62
dc.identifier.startpage403
dc.identifier.endpage426
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dc.identifier.issue3


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